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Ask A Healer Prescription Drugs Series





Who is best suited to self-treatment for health challenges?
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This is part two of a healing facilitation response on the question of using natural remedies along with prescription drugs. Read part one

This page also includes some cautions for those who seek to add natural acid-reducing supplements at the same time that they are taking Nexium, Protonic, Prilosec or similar meds.

Cautions also apply for those currently on statin drugs who are wondering if they can include natural cholesterol-reducing supplements to their regimen.

The best of both worlds!

I envision a time when doctors and herbalists work together. That would truly be the best of both worlds.

In that world, a doctor would consider natural remedies in cases where there is no life-threatening situation and there was time to see if the natural way would work.

In that world, a natural health practitioner would have faith that the doctor would work with them in acute cases and again allow the assistance of natural remedies once the crisis was over for the patient.

So, in the absense of such a world and after decades of self-treatment myself, I have about come to the conclusion that only the most disciplined person can self-treat, particularly if currently under treatment with drugs. The more drugs taken, the more risk of interaction.

In fact, it's very common for the drugs themselves to cause harmful interaction when several different drugs are given so adding herbs or supplements that might interact as well makes it even more difficult to monitor effect.

Who will self-treat best? The person who....

* Monitors their system responses and takes agressive action when imbalance occurs

* Engages the services of a doctor who will test more often and reduce meds when indicated

* Engages the services of a qualified naturopath, nutritionist and/or herbalist who monitors thru muscle-testing
If you are not willing to monitor your body all the time and see your doctor immediately when something changes, and if you haven't chosen a doctor willing to work at reducing medications as the body begins to balance and heal naturally, then you are probably better off sticking with the medical regimen.

For myself, the only prescription drugs I ever take are a very occasional muscle relaxer or sleeping pill (maybe twice a year) and an occasional aleeve. If I faced a life-threatening situation in which I felt natural remedies would not have time to work their slow but effective healing, I would take the drugs but with the goal in mind of tapering off of them as soon as possible.

The Natural vs Prescription Challenge:
If you are on prescription drugs to correct an imbalance or health challenge, you should carefully discuss with your doctor any containdications to adding natural acid reducers to your health care regimen.

This is because natural remedies that perform some of the same functions as their prescription drug counterparts could end up being too much of a good thing.

For example, if you are prescribed a medication to reduce acid, like Nexium, Protonix, Prilosec and then, you learn about the alkalizing or acid-reducing nature of certain foods, herbs or supplements and add them to your diet.

As your body ph begins to balance thru the use of alkalizing products or foods, what effect might that natural balancing have on medicines like Nexium, Protonix or Prilosec?

Or, let's say your doctor has you on statin drugs for high cholesterol and then, you embrace a nutritional program that begins to supply your body with nutrients for helping the heart clear out cholesterol naturally; how might this natural balancing change the effect of medications like lipitor and crestor?

Even water can change your need for medication if it is molecularly structured. If the water better helps your cells retain more nutrition and/or flushes out medication if taken at the same time with medication, you can see where this might be a concern.

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Health Care Disclaimer: If you are currently taking Nexium, Protonix or Prilosec, you should check with your doctor before adding any natural supplements aimed at reducing symptoms of acid reflux. The information on self-treatment is not intended to replace any needed medical evaluation. Self-treatment is a very personal health care choice and should be approached with a high degree of self-responsibility for success.